スティーブジョブズのスピーチ|全文英語&日本語和訳付[3]

steve-jobs-illbedead

スティーブジョブズのスピーチ[2]

My third story is about death.
3つ目の話は死についてです。

When I was 17, I read a quote that went something like: “If you live each day as if it was your last, someday you’ll most certainly be right.” (audience:Laugh)
私は17歳のときに「毎日をそれが人生最後の一日だと思って生きれば、その通りになる」という言葉にどこかで出合ったのです。(聴衆:笑)

It made an impression on me, and since then, for the past 33 years, I have looked in the mirror every morning and asked myself: “If today were the last day of my life, would I want to do what I am about to do today?” And whenever the answer has been “No” for too many days in a row, I know I need to change something.
それは印象に残る言葉で、その日を境に33年間、私は毎朝、鏡に映る自分に問いかけるようにしているのです。「もし今日が最後の日だとしても、今からやろうとしていたことをするだろうか」と。「違う」という答えが何日も続くようなら、ちょっと生き方を見直せということです。

Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything ― all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose. You are already naked. There is no reason not to follow your heart.
自分はまもなく死ぬという認識が、重大な決断を下すときに一番役立つのです。なぜなら、永遠の希望やプライド、失敗する不安…これらはほとんどすべて、死の前には何の意味もなさなくなるからです。本当に大切なことしか残らない。自分は死ぬのだと思い出すことが、敗北する不安にとらわれない最良の方法です。我々はみんな最初から裸です。自分の心に従わない理由はないのです。

About a year ago I was diagnosed with cancer. I had a scan at 7:30 in the morning, and it clearly showed a tumor on my pancreas. I didn’t even know what a pancreas was. The doctors told me this was almost certainly a type of cancer that is incurable, and that I should expect to live no longer than three to six months.
1年前、私はがんと診断されました。朝7時半に診断装置にかけられ、膵臓(すいぞう)に明白な腫瘍が見つかったのです。私は膵臓が何なのかさえ知らなかった。医者はほとんど治癒の見込みがないがんで、もっても半年だろうと告げたのです。

My doctor advised me to go home and get my affairs in order, which is doctor’s code for prepare to die. It means to try to tell your kids everything you thought you’d have the next 10 years to tell them in just a few months. It means to make sure everything is buttoned up so that it will be as easy as possible for your family. It means to say your goodbyes.
医者からは自宅に戻り身辺整理をするように言われました。つまり、死に備えろという意味です。これは子どもたちに今後10年かけて伝えようとしていたことを、たった数カ月で語らなければならないということです。家族が安心して暮らせるように、すべてのことをきちんと片付けなければならない。別れを告げなさい、と言われたのです。

I lived with that diagnosis all day. Later that evening I had a biopsy, where they stuck an endoscope down my throat, through my stomach and into my intestines, put a needle into my pancreas and got a few cells from the tumor. I was sedated, but my wife, who was there, told me that when they viewed the cells under a microscope the doctors started crying because it turned out to be a very rare form of pancreatic cancer that is curable with surgery. I had the surgery and thankfully I’m fine now.(audience:applause)
一日中診断結果のことを考えました。その日の午後に生検を受けました。のどから入れられた内視鏡が、胃を通って腸に達しました。膵臓に針を刺し、腫瘍細胞を採取しました。鎮痛剤を飲んでいたので分からなかったのですが、細胞を顕微鏡で調べた医師たちが騒ぎ出したと妻がいうのです。手術で治療可能なきわめてまれな膵臓がんだと分かったからでした。そして手術をして、おかげさまで現在、元気にこうしています。(聴衆:拍手)

This was the closest I’ve been to facing death, and I hope it’s the closest I get for a few more decades. Having lived through it, I can now say this to you with a bit more certainty than when death was a useful but purely intellectual concept:
人生で死にもっとも近づいたひとときでした。今後の何十年かはこうしたことが起こらないことを願っています。このような経験をしたからこそ、死というものがあなた方にとっても便利で大切な概念だと自信をもっていえます。

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life.
誰も死にたくない。天国に行きたいと思っている人間でさえ、死んでそこにたどり着きたいとは思わないでしょう。死は我々全員の行き先です。死から逃れた人間は一人もいない。それは、あるべき姿なのです。たぶん死は生命の最高の発明です。

It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.
それは生物を進化させる担い手です。古いものを取り去り、新しいものを生み出す。今、あなた方は新しい存在ですが、いずれは年老いて、消えゆくのです。深刻な話で申し訳ないですが、真実です。
(Ⅱコリント5:17の比喩的な引用?)

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma ―which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.
あなた方の時間は限られています。だから、本意でない人生を生きて時間を無駄にしないでください。ドグマにとらわれてはいけない。それは他人の考えに従って生きることと同じです。他人の考えに溺れるあまり、あなた方の内なる声がかき消されないように。

And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.(audience:applause)(drink water)
そして何より大事なのは、自分の心と直感に従う勇気を持つことです。あなた方の心や直感は、自分が本当は何をしたいのかもう知っているはず。ほかのことは二の次で構わないのです。(観衆:拍手)(水を飲む)

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960’s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.
私が若いころ、全地球カタログ(The Whole Earth Catalog)というすばらしい本に巡り合いました。私の世代の聖書のような本でした。スチュワート・ブランドというメンロパークに住む男性の作品で、詩的なタッチで躍動感がありました。パソコンやデスクトップ出版が普及する前の1960年代の作品で、すべてタイプライターとハサミ、ポラロイドカメラで作られていた。言ってみれば、グーグルのペーパーバック版です。グーグルの登場より35年も前に書かれたのです。理想主義的で、すばらしい考えで満ちあふれていました。

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous.
スチュワートと彼の仲間は全地球カタログを何度か発行し、一通りやり尽くしたあとに最終版を出しました。70年代半ばで、私はちょうどあなた方と同じ年頃でした。背表紙には早朝の田舎道の写真が。あなたが冒険好きなら、ヒッチハイクをする時に目にするような風景です。

Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.
その写真の下には「ハングリーなままであれ。愚かなままであれ」と書いてありました。筆者の別れの挨拶でした。ハングリーであれ。愚か者であれ。私自身、いつもそうありたいと思っています。そして今、卒業して新たな人生を踏み出すあなた方にもそうあってほしい。

Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.
ハングリーであれ。愚か者であれ。

Thank you all very much.
ありがとうございました。

スティーブ・ジョブズの2005年のスタンフォード大の卒業式のスピーチ
音声MP3ファイルをパソコンやスマホなどにダウンロードして聞く場合はこちら

音声ファイル

iPhoneでMP3ファイルをダウンロードする方法
↑のMP3ファイルのリンクをタップし、再生画面で共有ボタンをタップ
「”ファイル”に保存」を選択

米スタンフォード大卒業式(2005年6月)にてジョブズ氏スピーチ全文全訳
PDFファイルをパソコンやスマホなどにダウンロードする場合はこちら

PDFファイル

SteveJobsDots1

参照記事:日経新聞WEBサイト「ハングリーであれ。愚か者であれ」

This is a prepared text of the Commencement address delivered by Steve Jobs, CEO of Apple Computer and of Pixar Animation Studios, on June 12, 2005.

シェアする

  • このエントリーをはてなブックマークに追加

フォローする